TPS Lean and Scrum

TPS Lean and Scrum

1. TPS Lean and Scrum How they are developed and influenced one another Kiro Harada Attractor Inc.
3. बोिधसेन
4. Bodhisena visited Japan in 736 A.C. http://www.chinabuddhismencyclopedia.com/en/index.php?title=File:Bodhisena.jpg
7. “The principal object of management should be to secure the maximum prosperity for the employer, coupled with the maximum property for each employee”
8. “The important object of both the workmen and the management should be the training and development of each individual in the establishment, so that he can do (at his fastest pace and with the maximum of efficiency) the highest class of work for which his natural abilities fit him.”
9. Scientific Management improving economic efficiency, especially labor productivity by applying science to the engineering of processes and to management. Frederik Taylor
10. When we started thinking about Productivity? We’ve been doing try and errors all the time. When did we start thinking about improving?
11. In early 1900’s, We decided to specialize more to improve productivity: Thinkers and Doers
12. Managers and Workers
13. Manufacturing Line
14. A Manager for Managers?
15. Management Hierarchy http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tabulating_Machine_Co_Organization_Chart.jpg
16. and it worked GREAT!
17. Hawthorne Experiment (1924-1932) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawthorne_effect
18. What causes Productivity? http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/hawthorne/
19. Informal Organization
20. Origin of Human Relationship Theory
21. Organizational Sabotage
22. “The great majority of workmen still believe that if they were to work at their best speed they would be doing a great injustice to the whole trade by throwing a lot of men out of work.” The principles of scientific management - Frederick Taylor
23. Self-Management When did we start thinking of Autonomy?
24. Toyoda Type G Automatic Loom (1924) http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1924_Non-Stop_Shuttle_Change_Toyoda_Automatic_Loom,_Type_G_1.jpg
25. This loom was special: It automatically stops when a thread is broken. It only produces good product. An operator could manage 60 looms of this kind. A traditional loom needed an operator each.
26. The Machine that Changed the World (1990) Toyota’s Secret Weapon in the Global Car Wars Based on IMVP Phase 2 study (1984-1990)
27. Lean Manufacturing the expenditure of resources in any aspect other than the direct creation of value for the end customer to be wasteful, and thus a target for elimination.
28. 7 Wastes - Muda 無駄 Transportation Over-Processing Inventory Over-Production Motion Defects Waiting
29. Toyota Production System Figure curtesy of Satoshi Kuroiwa
30. Multi-skilled Worker Skill Map with Training Plans
31. TPS is not really about Manufacturing, rather more about Developing People
32. How TPS was born…
33. Toyoda Type G Automatic Loom (1924) http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1924_Non-Stop_Shuttle_Change_Toyoda_Automatic_Loom,_Type_G_1.jpg
34. Toyota was almost bankrupt in 1950’s. A major labor dispute resulted in resignation of most executives including the founder Kiichiro Toyoda. They had no money to buy extra machines, lines, parts and hire managers.
35. TWI Program in WW II (Training Within Industry) (1940 - 1945)
37. To make your work Easier and Safer
38. TWI was introduced in Japan
39. NUMMI (Now Tesla Factory)
40. New Profession: Programmer Ada Lovelace
41. Management the Development of Large Software Systems a.k.a. Waterfall Method
42. We’d tried to run Software Dev just like Manufacturing Factories http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KUKA#mediaviewer/File:BMW_Leipzig_MEDIA_050719_Download_Karosseriebau_max.jpg
43. but did not work Successful 14% Challenged 54% Cancelled 32% Chaos Report / 1994
44. I ANALYSIS See what PROGRAM DESIGN Winston Royce actually said: I I SYSTEM I coo,.o TESTING ANALYSIS PROGRAM DESIGN I coo,.o I OPER TESTING I OPERATIONS Figure 2. Implementation steps to develop a large computer program for delivery to a customer. Figure 2. Implementation steps to develop a large computer program for delivery to a customer. I believe in this concept, but the implementation described above is risky and invites failure. The problem is illustrated in Figure 4. The testing phase which occurs at the end of the development cycle is the first event for timing,concept, storage, input/output but transfers, the etc., are experienced as distinguished from I believe inwhich this implementation described above is risky and invites failure. The analyzed. These phenomena are not precisely analyzable. They are not the solutions to the standard partial differential equations of mathematical physics for instance. Yet if these phenomena fail to satisfy the various oblem is illustrated Figure The testing which external constraints, in then invariably a major4. redesign is required. A simple octal phase patch or redo of some isolated occurs at the end of the development cycle is the code will not fix these kinds of difficulties. The required design changes are likely to be so disruptive that the Winston W. Royce (1970). "Managing the Development of Large Software st event for which timing, storage, input/output transfers, etc., areSystems" experienced asof Western distinguished from in: In: Technical Papers Electronic Show and Convention software requirements upon which the design is based and which provides the rationale for everything are violated. Either the requirements must be modified, or a substantial change in the design is required. In effect (WesCon) August 25–28, 1970, Los Angeles, USA. in 1970 alyzed. These phenomena are not precisely analyzable. They are not the solutions to the standard partia and/or costs. the development process has returned to the origin and one can expect up to a lO0-percent overrun in schedule One might note that there has been a skipping-over of the analysis and code phases. One cannot, of
45. Software Crisis The Oregon Experiment (1975) , Christopher Alexander
46. Christopher Alexander
47. A Pattern Language (1977)
48. The Timeless Way of Building (1979)
49. "At the core... is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets and communities. This idea... comes simply from the observation that most of the wonderful places of the world were not made by architects but by the people". Christopher Alexander et al., A Pattern Language, front bookflap
50. Pattern Language
51. Eishin Gakuen Campus
52. Nature of Order (2004)
53. Pattern Language for Software Development? (1993)
54. Wiki Wiki Web
55. Hillside Group
56. Pattern Language of Programs
58. Organizational Patterns
59. Organizational Patterns WORK QUEUE INFORMAL LABOR PLAN DEVELOPER CONTROLS PROCESS SOMEONE ALWAYS MAKES PROGRESS COMMUNITY OF TRUST INTERRUPTS UNJAM BLOCKING PROGRAMMING EPISODE NAMED STABLE BASES ENGAGE CUSTOMERS TAKE NO SMALL SLIPS SURROGATE CUSTOMER ENGAGE QUALITY ASSURANCE GROUP VALIDATION COMPLETION HEADROOM RECOMMITMENT MEETING SCENARIOS DEFINE PROBLEM TEAM PRIDE FIREWALLS SIZE THE ORGANIZATION SELF SELECTING TEAM UNITY OF PURPOSE 3 TO 7 HELPERS PER ROLE PATRON ROLE PRODUCERS IN THE MIDDLE FEW ROLES PRODUCER ROLES ORGANIZATION FOLLOWS LOCATION HOLISTIC DIVERSITY COUPLING DECREASES LATENCY DISTRIBUTE WORK EVENLY MOVE RESPONSIBILITIES RESPONSIBILITES ENGAGE SHAPING CIRCULATION REALMS
60. Conway’s Law Any organization that designs a system (defined broadly) will produce a design whose structure is a copy of the organization's communication structure. —M. Conway
61. Organization Architecture and Product Architecture
62. OODA Loop (1976) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OODA_loop
63. Control Theory
64. Empirical Process
65. New New Product Development Game (1986) https://hbr.org/1986/01/the-new-new-product-development-game/ar/1
66. Knowledge Creating Company (1995) How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation
67. SECI Process SECI, Ba and Leadership: a United Model of Dynamic Knowledge Creation Ikujiro Nonaka, Ryoko Toyama and Noboru Konno
68. Community (as Ba)
69. Improve Productivity Quality by Stopping Specialization People are naturally multi-skilled. Swarm of People Kaizen Mind
70. Scrum 1990’s EASEL Company (Jeff Sutherland) ADM Company (Ken Schwaber) 1995 OOPSLA Paper 2002 Agile Project Management with Scrum (Ken and Mike Beedle)
71. Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developingsoftware by doing it and helping others do it.Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items onthe right, we value the items on the left more.
72. The Toyota Way (2003)
73. Lean Product and Process Development (2007)
74. Lean Product & Process Development Creation of Re-usable Knowledge Set-Based Concurrent Engineering Teams of Responsible Experts Cadence and Pull Visual Management Entrepreneurial System Designer (ESD)
75. ScrumPLoP (2010- )
78. http://qz.com/196200/toyota-is-becoming-more-efficient-by-replacing-robots-with-humans/
79. Scrum Scrum has been developed through struggle to find better ways. Scrum is not a method or process to tell you the right answer. Scrum is a tool to help you collaborate to find the better ways.
80. Scientific Management Hawthorne Experiment Ford System Training Within Industry Autonomous Loom Job Methods Toyota Production System Human Relationship Theory New New Product Develop Game A Pattern Language Software Patterns PLoPs Kaizen Knowledge Creation Company Scrum Lean Product Development Empirical Process Org Patterns ScrumPLoP
81. Continuing Future Scrum encourages you to: keep learning from others and keep practicing. keep helping others to learn. keep creating re-usable knowledge to improve your product, your process, your organization, your team and yourself, to have them more generative and lively. This is how scrum is developed and evolved and will be.
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アジャイルコーチ、ドメインモデラ、サプライチェーンコンサルタント。認定スクラムプロフェッショナル。 外資系消費財メーカーの研究開発を経て、2004年よりスクラムによる開発を実践。ソフトウェアのユーザーの業務、ソフトウェア開発・運用の業務の両方を、より楽に安全にする改善に取り組んでいる。

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